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Who's benefitting from learning with codetoday

Updated: Mar 4



Up until about a decade ago, programming was a field 'reserved' for a select few, shrouded in mystery. Outside of those who wrote software and games, there were on very few specialised fields in other professions who needed to know how to code. This has changed a lot in recent years, in part driven by the increasing amount of data available in most areas. More and more professions now can benefit from having programming as an additional skill. That's why we are offering a range of Python courses to suit the needs of modern professionals.


Below are some examples of people who have learnt Python with codetoday.


X is an analyst at an investment bank in the City. A lot of her work involves collecting data from several sources, collating them into a spreadsheet and then performing several mathematical and statistical tests on these data to understand links between various variables and spot any trends. She also spends quite a bit of time finding good ways of visualising results. Although she has become en expert in using Excel to its maximum capabilities, she noticed some of her colleagues who were spending less time playing around with the data and were obtaining more detailed analysis of it. They also weren't using Excel at all but were instead writing their own scripts using Python. This is when she realised she needed to step into the world of programming, both because she wanted to be able to be more efficient and productive in her work (and eliminate some of the boring work in Excel) but also, equally importantly, because she didn't want the risk of becoming obsolete in her workplace as more and more colleagues start to use programming to work on their data.


Y is a chemist who just joined a well known food manufacturing company straight after finishing his PhD as part of their research and development team. Part of his work will include looking at data collected by a large array of sensors in various stages of the production chain as well as within the storage facilities. This project was relatively new for the company and they had just identified the need to train their scientists in programming - many of them as chemists had no prior experience of coding. Y therefore joined a training programme that his company organised to introduce beginners to the programming, with an emphasis on the quantitative aspects of programming useful for scientific work. Y is also tutoring at first year undergrads at his old University and he's been advising them to find a programming course to cover the fundamentals so that when the time comes, they won't need to start from scratch.


Z is 43 and since leaving education has worked in a number of jobs including admin, sales and lately project management. She felt that she was stagnating a bit in her career and wanted to move away from the same type of jobs she's been doing. She noticed that many job adverts showed a desire for some programming knowledge even for jobs that were not directly related to software and technology. She therefore decided to join a beginner's course to see whether she may like programming, and she did. It wasn't easy but it was very enjoyable. She hasn't decided whether to move to a job in which she will need her new skill, so for now coding is just a hobby for her. And she finally can help her son in this subject too as he's just started learning programming too.


Unlike many programming schools and coding courses codetoday have taken a different path. It was important for us to create a course and a curriculum that was as much complimentary to existing skills as it was focussed on developing Python skills as most courses you see are heavily focussed on facilitating a career change or some such activity. Not everyone wants to do that, in fact most professionals we talk to want to be able to do their job better, that's where come in.



To learn more about Python courses for professionals register your interest below.